GoingSustainable http://www.goingsustainable.com The portal for sustainable companies Thu, 16 Feb 2017 20:55:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Global goals for sustainable developmenthttp://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainability-strategy-reporting/global-goals-sustainable-development/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainability-strategy-reporting/global-goals-sustainable-development/#comments Mon, 05 Oct 2015 06:01:23 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=60690 The next generation of leaders will be defined by how companies respond to the opportunities created by the SDGs.

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In June 2015 – IMPACT’ - a landmark Report authored by DNV GL was launched in the UN General Assembly. The report is an assessment of the impact of the UN Global Compact over the last 15 years and the progress that has been made towards its vision of a sustainable and inclusive economy. Based on resources that included interviews with over 200 business and civil society leaders, we believe it is the most complete and authoritative view of the history of the corporate sustainability movement so far.

Our evaluation adopted a model for assessing change which was framed around three interconnecting levels – recognising that progress must happen across all three levels simultaneously if transformative change is to be achieved. The three levels were:

a)      Dominant worldviews (the attitudes values and beliefs that shape our understanding of business and the economy).

b)      Corporate operating environment (key drivers such as regulation, finance and education)

c)       Corporate practices (company activity that aligns with the 10 UN Global Compact Principles).

The corporate world we describe in 2015 is radically different from the picture in 2000 when the Global Compact was launched. At the outset only a very few leading companies acknowledged the challenges of sustainable development, whereas today over 8,000 businesses have signed up to honour the Global Compact’s 10 principles. In fact, by March 2015, 58 million people were employed by signatory companies, a group that includes 25% of the FORTUNE Global 500.

However, while much has been achieved and there is an undeniable momentum, it is equally clear that we need to move up a gear if the Global Compact’s vision of a sustainable and inclusive economy will be met by 2030.

In making our recommendations for what business, the Global Compact and others should do next, we drew heavily on the impending Global Goals for Sustainable Development (SDGs), a new resource that was being prepared and that companies will be able to draw upon to support their business strategies, while contributing to a sustainable and inclusive economy.

On 25-27 September world leaders adopted the SDGs as part of an ambitious plan to eradicate poverty, fuel inclusive growth and protect the environment, at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit. Focusing on 17 global goals, the post-2015 development agenda is an important long-term framework that will define new ways of doing business while supporting prosperity and societal needs. With a record participation of over 150 heads of state and government and a speech by the Pope, the SDG Summit is set to be a historic event.

The SDGs are broad ranging in their scope and are intended to build upon what has been achieved through the Millennium Development Goals (which ended this year). In contrast to the MDGs, business has been closely involved in the development of the SDGs – and business is expected to play a central role in achieving them. This is where we see a great opportunity for companies that are serious about driving change – and recognise that meeting the SDGs will support their longer term business success.

The final part of IMPACT describes our views on pathways to a sustainable and inclusive economy. Our recommendations followed the ‘three levels’ model that underpinned our assessment, meaning that transformative change will only happen if company activity is supported by an external operating environment that encourages them and where the dominant worldview recognises the benefits that will be accrued by acting more sustainably. You will see from the summary below, committing to the Global Compact and adopting the SDG’s form a key part of these recommendations to business.

Leadership companies should now actively support the process of creating national plans to implement SDGs, supporting governments and other actors to overcome the inevitable obstacles and create a road map that will inspire others to become involved.

SDG image

It is encouraging to see the business community so actively involved in the development of the SDGs. By improving the alignment between business and global priorities, we should expect to see the level of engagement from business increase and a greater chance of progress on global challenges.

By adopting the SDGs and contributing to creation of national plans, companies will minimise their exposure to a broader range of risks, identify new business opportunities and increase their resilience and efficiency.

The next generation of leaders will be defined by how companies respond to the opportunities created by the SDGs. A first step for any company that is serious about its sustainability mission will be to assess how its current strategy aligns with the breadth of issues covered by the SDGs and identify the inevitable gaps. Being able to understand how the SDGs offer an opportunity to benefit your organisation is critical to support the business case for adopting the goals – and will define the leadership agenda for years to come.

See also: Pariah to partner: how business got a seat at Sustainable Development Goals’ table 

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Fragmentation in Asian-Pacific healthcarehttp://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainable-healthcare/fragmentation-in-asian-pacific-healthcare/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainable-healthcare/fragmentation-in-asian-pacific-healthcare/#comments Wed, 16 Sep 2015 09:31:13 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=58889 Two themes were recurring at the HMA conference; the growing demands from ageing populations and the challenge of meeting these in fragmented systems.

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830 people from 30 countries across the Asia-Pacific region attended the Hospital Management Asia (HMA) conference in Yangon, Myanmar. I was privileged to give a keynote speech on risk-based systems thinking as part of a panel discussion on the characteristics of high performing hospitals. During the conversations that I had with conference participants, two recurring themes were identified: the growing demands arising from ageing populations and the challenge of meeting these in fragmented systems with variable quality.

Number of seniors increasing
The region is currently home to approximately 300 million people aged 65 or above – over half of the world’s total senior population. This number is growing rapidly due to improvements in life expectancy. As a result, Asia’s ageing population is expected to reach 565 million by 2030. Japan is home to the fastest-ageing population in the world, with almost a quarter of its population being over the age of 65 – more than in the US and Europe. While Hong Kong, China, Thailand, the Republic of Korea, and Singapore are also seeing a rise in their elderly populations. As the population ages, so the number of people living longer with chronic illnesses grows – increasing the need for healthcare products and services. This is because people living with chronic diseases require continuous monitoring, treatment, supervision and early intervention to prevent further deterioration.

Fragmented care
At the same time as the region faces such growing demands, it also has to tackle the issue of variable quality and fragmented care. The Asia-Pacific, one of the fastest growing emerging health care markets in the world, has the widest variations in the health care systems across countries. An array of health care delivery systems exists, ranging from fully developed universal health coverage to disjointed healthcare systems with minimal healthcare coverage, limited national guidelines and regulations.

Such fragmentation poses a clear and significant threat to patients – particularly older adults with multiple complex chronic needs that cannot be addressed by single specialists working alone. A holistic, personalized approach to healthcare requires improvements in cohesion, coordination and communication between systems. As Degos and colleagues noted in 2009, lapses in the delivery of quality care “… no longer relate only to episodic errors and failures in procedures at specific times, but also to cumulative failures throughout a patient’s journey within a health system”.

Expectations from healthcare consumers
Consumers of healthcare increasingly expect health services to be modeled on other service sectors. People want to be engaged and consulted by their healthcare providers. Many more are better informed and more likely to challenge health professionals compared to earlier generations. There is a demand for easy 24 hour access. The International Alliance of Patient Organisations’ 2012 review of healthcare indicators reflects that this is driving policy imperatives for greater person-centered and integrated care both nationally and internationally, including within Asia-Pacific.

The conversations at the HMA show that the region faces significant challenges. But all of the delegates that I spoke with were committed to working together to improve and to ensure a seamless patient journey. DNV GL is in a unique position to help healthcare policy makers and providers in the region in overcoming their challenges. Our 150+ year history of risk thinking is focused on improving the safety and reliability of systems – i.e. the ability to see patterns and connections rather than silos. Working together we will go faster and further in ensuring that the needs of ageing populations in Asia-Pacific are met.

Learn more about our work on co-creating person-centred care.

Learn more about our work on developing integrated care standards.

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Sustainability and supply chain management in the food and drink sectorhttp://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainable-supply-chain/sustainability-supply-chain-management-food-drink-sector/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainable-supply-chain/sustainability-supply-chain-management-food-drink-sector/#comments Fri, 08 May 2015 20:35:56 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=48718 An increasing number of sustainability issues are working their way up the agenda

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Highlights from the briefing, run by DNV GL and Institute of Food Science & Technology (IFST).

An increasing number of sustainability issues are working their way up the agenda of companies in the Food and Drink sector and an overwhelming number of these are prominent within the supply chain.  As the global population swells and the demand for food surges, we find ourselves seeking answers to an ever-growing list of pressing questions.

DNV GL’s briefing, in collaboration with IFST, saw speakers from Waitrose, Caffè Nero and Kolak Snack Foods Ltd reinforce the need for a clear sustainability strategy embedded across the organization, debate the importance of supply chain integration, and offer practical tips for delivering against a retailer’s sustainability demands.

Common conversation points included the magnitude of food wasted along the supply chain; the legitimacy of the Genetically Modified (GM) debate; the need to speed up our ability to blend science and technology with ‘traditional’ food production and to overcome imminent food shortages; the resilience of agriculture to fluctuating energy prices and dwindling oil supplies, and the West’s ability to compete against growing South-South trade.  Against this backdrop, the UK retail sector is currently in turmoil, with many supermarkets facing a critical decision: to join a price war and potentially compromise on their values, or begin competing on a different basis.

A summary of key discussion points:

Communicate with Authenticity

  • Lead with your values. Your values should underpin your organization’s sustainability strategy and communications, linking to your brand purpose.
  • Measure what you manage. Stakeholders want to see demonstrable evidence behind your communications.
  • Apply the role of ‘self-evidence’. Consumers trust less and expect more. Rather than relying on stakeholders to believe what you tell them, allow them, where possible, to discover your values for themselves, for example, through reduced packaging, improved quality, or better nutritional profile.

Put the ‘triple’ back into the triple bottom line

Don’t forget the economics in your triple bottom line. To maximize effectiveness and buy-in from across the business, the approach to sustainability initiatives should also consider the bottom line and potential return on investment as well as ESG benefits (environmental, social; and governance).

Make the business case. Whilst many organizations recognize the business case for sustainability, their focus tends to be on non-financial benefits including enhanced reputation, efficiencies, and improved traceability. The majority have yet to make the link between their sustainability performance and financial success.

Traceability – Where to draw the line?

Traceability from farm to fork. Visibility across large and complex supply chains is notoriously difficult, as demonstrated by the horsemeat scandal of 2013.  As stakeholders demand greater accountability from manufacturers and retailers, where should they draw the line?  The feasibility and value of managing and monitoring supplier practices along the entire length of the supply chain was discussed.  Some draw line at their tier two suppliers, while others have begun a transition to direct, vertically integrated sourcing by cutting out intermediaries and establishing direct relationships with suppliers.

Managing the real risks to deliver real value.  Increased monitoring and move to vertical integration helps secure food quality and traceability. However, participants noted the importance of commercial balance and a value driven approach.  For every sustainability initiative within the supply chain, is it something that will improve the commercial proposition, manage risks to reputation, or save costs? If not, what is the benefit, and can the business afford to subsidize it?

Two heads are better than one

Scale-up your impact. Some things are too big to tackle individually, while others require management on a broader scale. Collaborating with others and, in particular, with suppliers creates a win-win situation. By sharing technical knowledge, insights and resources, organisations can assist their suppliers in realising their sustainability initiatives in a fraction of the time, ultimately benefitting both parties.

Price Wars

Spot the difference between price and cost. By treating the supplier relationship as a commodity, you’ll likely be driven by price. By treating it as a partnership, you’ll become more values-led.

View the bigger picture. Although tempting to buy on price alone, this approach can often cost more in the long-term, through greater administrative efforts, management of a wider pool of suppliers that you may not know, and auditing and assessment of suppliers unlikely to share your values. Paying a higher price to a smaller number of more reputable suppliers who share your values can result in lower financial costs in the long run.

Health hits the headlines

Consider consumer choice. Health is hitting the headlines, calling into question the legitimacy of the sale of food and drink products high in sugar, saturated fat and salt. Retailers cannot respond by removing all ‘unhealthy’ products from their shelves, thus reducing customer choice. So what’s the answer? Manufacturers and retailers are increasingly turning to ‘choice editing’. By working to improve the health impacts of products ‘behind the scenes’, organizations aren’t forcing customers to choose – they’re doing it for them.

Sustainability Journey – What is the destination?

Sustainability is a driver which brings with it both challenges and opportunities.  Many future solutions will result from responsible research and innovation which includes collaboration between retailers, manufacturers, academics, Government departments, and NGOs all bringing different areas of expertise.

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How to finally take science-based goals from rhetoric to realityhttp://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainability-strategy-reporting/finally-take-science-based-goals-rhetoric-reality/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainability-strategy-reporting/finally-take-science-based-goals-rhetoric-reality/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 19:47:04 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=46114 With companies across industries taking up the mantle of sustainability, considering how and why corporate goals are selected in hugely important.

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Sustainability is mainstreaming, right? You can’t walk through a city, listen to the news or buy a product without hearing something is sustainable, green, eco-friendly — and the list of claims goes on.

So, how much of this is rhetoric, and how much of this actually can be backed up by empirical evidence?

Many organizations are able to demonstrate reasonable sustainability performance, such as consistent energy efficiency improvements over the last three years, a decrease in normalized CO2 emissions or more social responsibility audits in their supply chain than ever before.

All good, then? Job done. We have embedded sustainability into our operations and can get on with business while feeling warm and fuzzy inside.

But what is the evidence really showing us? We need to remind ourselves of the bigger picture: Are future opportunities unlimited or is future value creation being put at risk; how is our home planet doing; how is society changing?

While it is true and commendable that some fantastic progress has been and is being made, many trends concerning some of our most critical life support systems and basic human rights are not improving. In fact, many are doing just the opposite.

What science really tells us

In February, I had the pleasure of leading a half-day tutorial on the science of science-based goals at the annual GreenBiz Forum in Scottsdale, Ariz.

We started by reminding ourselves of the greater scheme of things. While the planet has been around 4.6 billion years (give or take a few years), we, as humans, have only been around for the last 200,000 years or so, and didn’t really get going until the last 250 years, with the advent of the industrial revolution.

In this time — the blink of an eye in planetary time — we have achieved many amazing things. We have created unprecedented infrastructure, sanitation and education. We have transformed natural resources into everything from this laptop I am writing on to the sumptuous afternoon cakes we were tempted with at the forum. We have been prolific and imaginative, resourceful and creative.

During the session, we reviewed some high level graphs which showed that with the acceleration of many indicators of progress comes a similarly steep acceleration of our draw on our earth’s assets.
While we have pulled millions out of poverty, the global population has grown faster. Millions — in fact, more than 2.2 billion people — lived on less than $2 a day in 2011, according to the World Bank.

Further evidence is seen in the fantastic work of many scientists carefully sourced and adapted by Will Steffen and others, such as shown in the great acceleration.

Additionally, the summary of UNEP’s review of environmental trends — GEO-5 (PDF), shows that many environmental trends are worsening. While science isn’t static and our understanding continuously develops, there is pretty irrefutable evidence that we are negatively affecting our ability to live well on Earth.

The opportunity: improving quality and relevance of corporate goals

However, there is an upside to all of this.

Great insight on approaches to get us back on track — that can enable corporations to set goals and targets that build value for the enterprise as well as society — was provided by panelists Kathrin Winkler from EMC, Andrew Winston of Winston Eco-Strategies and Nicole Labutong from the CDP.

It was exciting to see the interest and engagement from attendees, and it seems the time is right to ratchet up the quality and relevance of corporate goal setting. Done well, this will close this gap between the rhetoric and the reality of what we collectively need to ensure the success of our businesses in the markets of the next 20 years (not to mention keeping our life support system healthy).

We need to look at what the best science and evidence available tells us, then work backwards so that we set goals that will put us on track to live within our means in culturally and ethically acceptable ways. It requires a fundamental shift in our sophistication.

Winston took us through the headlines of his pivot goals research, conducted with Jeff Gowdy and the team at Vanderbilt University. This showed us that although 75 percent of Fortune 200 corporations have sustainability goals as of September, only 20 percent of these goals qualify as science- or ethics-equivalent goals (only a few are explicitly science-based), according to the pivot goals criteria.

In fact, only a handful of companies have multiple goals that hit the mark. Unilever stands out with 20 goals that fulfill the criteria.

How available and reliable is science for business?

Labutong focused in on a company’s fair shares of emissions reductions in order to reduce CO2 emissions in line with the science of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, specifically by following a sector-based decarbonization approach.

Science-based emissions targets aim to keep the planet within the widely accepted global goal of a 2 degree C temperature increase from pre-industrial levels.

Labutong explained more about the Science Based Targets initiative, a collaboration of the CDP, United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute and WWF Climate Savers. This provides free tools and guidance to help companies set emission reduction targets in line with climate science.

She also introduced a number of other methodologies and tools that companies can use for a range of impacts. Not only are there tools that are readily available, the CDP will incentivize companies to implement science based targets in 2016.

I recall hearing Herbert Giradet, an eminent environmentalist, speaking in my hometown of Swindon, U.K. He said that while CO2 is only one impact area, it is a great proxy for overall environmental impact; if we get this right, other environmental trends are likely to follow.

I think he is right. Carbon emissions are a great starting point — and one where business has the tools available to take action now.

‘Context-based’ goals and fusing science with strategy

Technology firm EMC Corporation is one example of a company that has worked to develop science-based goals. Winkler, chief sustainability officer of EMC, showed how climate science translates to reality for executives.

As Winkler neatly explained, there is more to science than the science itself. It is also about getting buy-in from your executives and presenting a business case that enables a company to stretch its time horizons into the real strategic zone — without creating a threat to business growth and better understood shorter term measures.

Involving a range of executive reviewers, including those most skeptical, not only helps address their concerns, but also importantly brings the variety of voices needed to fully frame the organization’s context.

EMC considered a range of sources for its carbon emissions targets and have established targets to 2050, as well as shorter-term targets to 2020 and the end of this year, 2015.

They evaluated a number of models including the Autodesk-developed C-FACT. These models do not penalize a company if it begins to contribute a greater proportional share of GDP (such as capturing market share), which was a concern for some when the idea was proposed.

Kathrin also suggested that calling this approach “context”-based targets may be more accurate, as science can only provide some of the basis for effective goal setting.

Following through

No shortage of other initiatives are out there to help organizations set more impactful and relevant corporate social responsibility goals.

Many organizations have been referring to principles to help guide their thinking, from the GRI content principles to the 10 principles of the United Nations Global Compact. The excellent and freely available open source Future Fit Framework provides a sound basis for 28 goals across nine impact areas.

Planet
Future-Fit Business Benchmark

The Future-Fit Business Benchmark initiative links 28 types of strategic goals.

Identifying the most material of these issues for your business — and then translating these issues these into a set of SMART (Specific, Measurable, Assignable, Relevant, Timebound) goals — was suggested as a sensible next step during the GreenBiz Forum 15 workshop.

As the rigor in measuring progress against a greater range of issues improves, businesses are faced with a number of follow-up questions, such as whether thresholds should be used (should workplace accidents be zero? Should female representation on the board be 50 percent?).

The general consensus was yes, thresholds should be clear. It is the very rare company which does not have a goal of zero workplace fatalities, for example.

Moving beyond explicit thresholds, what is a credible constant to derive a goal? Social dynamics where the science is informed by ethical, moral and cultural considerations are another big area of importance. While we are unlikely to jump to a clear consensus across all issues — and there undoubtedly will be some cultural variation — a number of themes emerged.

One idea was that if it is left to individual businesses, then differences in acceptable thresholds will proliferate. The UNEP’s forthcoming Making Environmental Reporting Important to All report discusses improvement opportunities for environmental reporting, and asks the question of whether it or other supranational organizations/collaborations, such as the Science Based Targets group, should determine thresholds and provide recommendations.

Kevin Rabinovitch, global director of sustainability at Mars, provided a simple and effective suggestion to test the quality of your science- or context-based goals: reverse the target or goal and see whether it sounds reasonable. For example, if you have a goal to reduce waste to landfill by 5 percent by 2020, flip the context of this goal and consider whether sending 95 percent of waste to landfill until 2020 is something you are comfortable with.

In reality, will we achieve true sustainability? The answer is likely not. However, I truly believe that we can make choices that can help develop our businesses, our society and reduce the draw on our resource base now and into the future.

Developing a vision of what our companies might look like and how we want them to operate in 2030 and beyond, with measures and targets to guide progress, is a great next step. Giving them a sound science basis and context can help shift corporate sustainability from rhetoric to a new level of sophistication that makes sense and drives innovation and future success.

Previously published on GreenBiz.com

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Mixed methods: improving the assessment of safety culture in healthcarehttp://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainable-healthcare/improving-assessment-safety-culture-healthcare/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/sustainable-healthcare/improving-assessment-safety-culture-healthcare/#comments Fri, 06 Mar 2015 10:54:26 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=39874 In this position paper, quantitative and qualitative methods are combined to improve the accuracy of results for when a healthcare organization’s safety culture is assessed.

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Safety culture is the way in which organizations live and breathe safety. It is the foundation of delivering quality care as a positive safety culture is linked to favorable staff safety behavior and patient outcomes.

If there is to be improvement in the quality of healthcare, the assessment of safety culture is paramount as the results have the potential to enable an organization to understand its strengths and weaknesses with regards to where they should target change. For example, assessment of safety culture can contribute to the decision making processes for healthcare leaders dealing with challenges related to lack of trust within the organization.

In this position paper, we make the case for using a mixed methods approach, in which quantitative and qualitative methods are combined, to improve the accuracy of results for when a healthcare organization’s safety culture is assessed. The mixed methods approach has been tested by DNV GL, Strategic Research and Innovation, Healthcare Program, in healthcare settings in several countries. Early results from the testing and development are outlined in this paper. The results suggest that a mixed methods approach is useful in assisting healthcare organizations to better understand their safety culture in order to improve practices.

Preliminary results of the studies offer suggestions for practical steps for the assessment of safety culture in healthcare: combining quantitative and qualitative assessment. This position paper describes how best to use the results and achieve maximum value for organizational learning.

Read the paper here

“[Safety culture matters because] the simple fact that companies with similar technology, management systems, and other pre-conditions to safety have significant differences in their safety performance”
– Sondre Øie, Senior Consultant, DNV GL Oil and Gas

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10 things you need to know about the ISO 2015 revisions – STEP 10http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-10/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-10/#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 11:54:11 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=35383 The final posts in the series covers the timeline for implementation, some recommendations on ‘what now’, and also some suggestions for useful resources.

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In my previous blogs I covered:

Step 1: ISO Publication and Beyond
Step 2: The High Level Structure
Step 3: Clauses 1, 2 and 3 – Scope, Normative References and Terms and Definitions
Step 4: Context of the Organization
Step 5: Leadership
Step 6: Planning
Step 7: Support
Step 8: Operation
Step 9: Performance evaluation and improvement

A quick reminder of the 10 Clauses of the High Level Structure:

1. Scope
2. Normative References
3. Terms and references
4. Context of the organization
5. Leadership
6. Planning
7. Support
8. Operation
9. Performance evaluation
10. Improvement

My series of blogs has covered these Clauses, and has hopefully provided some context and direction for your organization in getting to grips with the new ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015. This final step in my series covers the timeline for implementation, some recommendations on ‘what now’, and also some suggestions for useful resources.

With the actual publication of ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015, there will be a three year transition period for organizations to move their certifications from the current versions to the new versions, so there is plenty of time to make progress. But we would strongly recommend starting to consider the changes now in order to make the process as smooth as possible.

In terms of ‘what now’, here are some suggestions:

Make the most use you can of the information which is freely available! There is a lot out there (including some excellent blogs….), both publicly available, and also via membership organizations including the Chartered Quality Institute (CQI) and the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA).

Get to grips with the standards and start to look at how you align against the key changes (and the not-so-key changes). Use the shared knowledge of your organization and seek to engage your senior managers in this process, because, as I have said in a number of the blogs, the new standards are raising the profile of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 and now require the engagement of senior management to a higher degree.

This might sound a bit glib, but – get a copy of ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015 (and if possible ISO 9000:2015 also)! These are the key documents you need and will be in place for a number of years.

Talk with your Certification Body, and your Lead Auditor about the changes, with the potential for anything from a brief discussion at this point to potential workshops, training or gap assessments. We are expecting our Lead Auditors to talk to you at every available opportunity.

Finally, grasp the opportunity to try and use the changes to engage more widely with your organization, not just with the senior management. The standards are strong on the need to engage with a whole range of interested parties- and your staff is one of the most important. Take the opportunity as early as possible to sit down with the right people to look at the changes and review how you may already meet part or all of the key requirements around- interested parties; risk and opportunities; organization context and scoping; leadership engagement and delivering a strong process approach. Undertake your own initial gap analysis and start to consider what you need to change in your management system and how you can achieve the required changes.

I hope that this updated series of the ’10 Steps’ has been useful, and we wish you success with your journey to ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015!

P.S. Don’t forget about ISO 45001- the International Standard being developed on Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems which will replace OHSAS 18001:2007 in 2016. The standard is now at Committee Draft Two stage with an anticipated Final Draft International Standard (DIS) in March/April 2016. More blogs to come on that…..

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Contact us for support: Transition to the ISO 2015 revisions.

Do you have questions related to  the ISO 9001:2015 & ISO 14001:2015 revisions? Post them in our LinkedIn group , and our auditors Doug Milne and Niall Pembery will get back to you.

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10 things you need to know about the ISO 2015 revisions – STEP 9http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-9/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-9/#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 09:16:10 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=34449 This post covers clause 9 & 10, performance evaluation and improvement

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In my previous blogs I covered:

Step 1: ISO Publication and Beyond
Step 2:
The High Level Structure
Step 3: Clauses 1, 2 and 3 – Scope, Normative References and Terms and Definitions
Step 4: Context of the Organization
Step 5: Leadership
Step 6: Planning
Step 7: Support
Step 8: Operation

A quick reminder of the 10 Clauses of the High Level Structure- this blog covers Clause 9:
1. Scope
2. Normative References
3. Terms and references
4. Context of the organization
5. Leadership
6. Planning
7. Support
8. Operation
9. Performance evaluation
10. Improvement

I’ve decided to put these two Clauses into the one blog for a couple of reasons – the first one is because they are significantly similar to the existing ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 in many respects, and also because the two clauses cover the performance evaluation, improvement and internal assurance aspects of the newly configured standards.

Clause 9 covers three main elements:

9.1: Monitoring, measurement, evaluation and analysis

9.2: Internal Audit

9.3: Management review

For sub-clause 9.1, the content differs between ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015. For ISO 9001:2015, 9.1 contains familiar content on customer satisfaction and analysis and evaluation, whilst for ISO 14001:2015 it contains the familiar content on evaluation of compliance. For both there are requirements broadly similar to the existing ISO 9001 and ISO 14001, but with a more holistic approach and a stronger drive for evidence of evaluation of key performance data.

The sub-clauses 9.2 Internal Audit, and sub-clause 9.3 Management Review are largely the same as the existing standards, but with some broader topics and alignment with the new language of risks and opportunities, and the context of the organization.

Clause 10 effectively covers three main elements:

A general statement requiring the organization to determine improvement opportunities and implement necessary actions.

A sub-clause on nonconformity and corrective action.

A sub-clause on continual improvement.

For the sub-clause on nonconformity and corrective action, much of the content is familiar and similar to the existing standards, but as many of you will already know, the term Preventive Action has now been completely deleted from all of the standards. Why? Because the new High Level Structure (HLS) is built on the fundamental principles of risk management, which embodies the need to identify risk and manage those risks, with the ultimate goal of risk elimination. Hence there is no need for the term preventive action when we have the principles and expectations of risk management. The content of the sub-clause on continual improvement is also similar to the existing standards, and effectively re-emphasizes elements of performance and improvement documented elsewhere in the standards.

Overall these two Clauses contain much which is familiar to the existing ISO 9001 and ISO 14001, but we should not forget the benefits of the High Level Structure (HLS) in providing the common and consistent framework and structure for these evaluation and improvement parts of the standards. There are some nuances in content and terminology, and some expansion of requirements, but these are not significant and can be tackled relatively easily.

In my last blog, Step 10, I will draw some overall conclusions and also set the scene for the transition to the new Standards.

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Contact us for support: Transition to the ISO 2015 revisions.

Do you have questions related to  the ISO 9001:2015 & ISO 14001:2015 revisions? Post them in our LinkedIn group , and our auditors Doug Milne and Niall Pembery will get back to you.

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10 things you need to know about the ISO 2015 revisions – STEP 8http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-8/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-8/#comments Fri, 09 Jan 2015 07:52:16 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=32663 This post covers clause 8, which represents the production and operational control parts of the standards.

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In my previous blogs I covered:

Step 1: ISO Publication and Beyond
Step 2: The High Level Structure
Step 3: Clauses 1, 2 and 3 – Scope, Normative References and Terms and Definitions
Step 4: Context of the Organization
Step 5: Leadership
Step 6: Planning
Step 7: Support

A quick reminder of the 10 Clauses of the High Level Structure- this blog covers Clause 8:

1. Scope
2. Normative References
3. Terms and references
4. Context of the organization
5. Leadership
6. Planning
7. Support
8. Operation
9. Performance evaluation
10. Improvement

This Clause basically represents the production and operational control parts of the Standards- the ‘engine house’ of production (particularly for ISO 9001). It is probably best to discuss each separately, as, in a similar way to the existing ISO 9001 and ISO 14001, there are big differences in the content and detail for each.

ISO 14001:2015 is the easiest to discuss- it has two basic sub-clauses:

8.1 Operational planning and control

8.2 Emergency preparedness and response

These two are basically very similar to the existing 4.4.6 and 4.4.7 in ISO 14001:2004. Regarding the sub-clause 8.1, this is pretty similar, but with updates reflecting the more process-based approach and consideration of a life cycle perspective. There is clear content on the need to consider the life cycle perspective relating to design and development, procurement of products and services, communications with relevant external parties and downstream issues associated with transport, delivery, use, end-of-life and disposal. For sub-clause 8.2 on Emergency preparedness and response, it is very similar to the existing 4.4.7 in terms of response, planning, exercises and review.

For ISO 9001:2015, there are a number of sub-clauses added to the basic High Level Structure (HLS) sub-clause 8.1 of Operational planning and control:

8.1 Operational planning and control

8.2 Requirements for products and services

8.3 Design and development of products and services

8.4 Control of externally provided processes, products and services

8.5 Production and service provision

8.6 Release of products and services

8.7 Control of nonconforming outputs

So this clause really covers in the main what was covered under the ISO 9001:2008 Clause 7 Product realization- with some key additions and differences. I have summarized these below:

8.1 Operational planning and control: this is very clear about the importance of linking this clause to the critical elements of Clause 4.4 where the critical processes and their interactions are determined. There are also some additional requirements on control of changes (which are made more explicit now- but should be managed under any good management system!), and also on control over outsourced processes (previously covered under the purchasing clause of ISO 9001:2008).

8.2 Requirements for products and services: very similar to ISO 9001:2008 Clauses 7.2.1- 7.2.3 but now with some added content on communications relating to customer property and contingency actions.

8.3 Design and development of products and services: this follows much of the existing Clause 7.3, but with clearer structure and requirements around when a design and development process is required (8.3.1); for design and development planning consideration of needs from customers and from key documented information (which should be happening already!) (8.3.2); for design and development inputs a wider set of inputs including resource considerations and potential consequences of failures (8.3.3).

8.4 Control of externally provided processes, products and services: this sub-clause is now more holistic and wider in terms of referring to externally provided processes, products or services rather than the existing ISO 9001 clause on Purchasing. It also makes clear the criteria for applying the requirements.

8.5 Production and service provision: most of this sub-clause is very similar in content and intent to the existing requirements in ISO 9001:2008. The main change is with the two additional sub-sub-clauses 8.5.5 Post-Delivery Activities and 8.5.6 Control of Changes- these are mentioned in the existing standard, but these requirements are now much more clearly defined and specified.

8.6 Release of products and services: limited additional requirements.

8.7 Control of nonconforming outputs: limited additional requirements.

Overall ISO 9001:2015 has broadened the terminology and scope of the operations and production clause, whilst retaining much of the existing ISO 9001 content. The approach adopted is also aligned with the common process-based aspects of the High Level Structure (HLS), and covers more effectively the complete end-to-end production and service provision process.

In Step 9 I will look at the last two Clauses: Performance Evaluation and Improvement.

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Contact us for support: Transition to the ISO 2015 revisions.

Do you have questions related to  the ISO 9001:2015 & ISO 14001:2015 revisions? Post them in our LinkedIn group , and our auditors Doug Milne and Niall Pembery will get back to you.

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10 things you need to know about the ISO 2015 revisions – STEP 7http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/iso2015-revisions-step7-support/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/iso2015-revisions-step7-support/#comments Fri, 19 Dec 2014 09:49:19 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=30486 Clause 7: Support covers all the areas relating to the ‘people, place and procedural’ aspects of the management systems.

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In my previous blogs I covered:

Step 1: ISO Publication and Beyond
Step 2:
The High Level Structure
Step 3:
Clauses 1, 2 and 3 – Scope, Normative References and Terms and Definitions
Step 4: Context of the Organization
Step 5: Leadership
Step 6:
Planning

A quick reminder of the 10 Clauses of the High Level Structure- this blog covers Clause 7:

1 Scope
2 Normative References
3 Terms and references
4 Context of the organization
5 Leadership
6 Planning
7 Support
8 Operation
9 Performance evaluation
10 Improvement

This clause of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 gathers together in one place all the areas relating to the ‘people, place and procedural’ aspects of the management systems. The basic High Level Structure sub-clauses cover the following:

7.1 Resources
7.2 Competence
7.3 Awareness
7.4 Communication
7.5 Documented Information

Looking at the content within Clause 7 which is common to ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015:

  • There are familiar requirements relating to the provision of resources for the management system and the effective delivery of the scope of services (7.1)
  • There are also familiar requirements relating to ensuring that those resources are competent, including evaluation of training needs, actions and demonstration of competence (7.2)
  • The sub-clause on awareness is also broadly similar to the existing 9001 and 14001 content, although a bit more explicit on awareness requirements and now more consistent between 9001 and 14001 (7.3).
  • With communications, there has also been some more harmonization from the High Level Structure in making clear the importance of both internal and external communications (i.e. the current ISO 9001:2008 doesn’t really include external communications very well) (7.4).
  • For Documented Information, most of the text is familiar and is similar in requirements to the existing 9001 and 14001, but there is logically some wider wording on the electronic and web-based environments we now inhabit (7.5). It is worth emphasizing here that the revised ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 no longer specify the need for documented procedures- it is up to the organization to decide what is needed. BUT the standards specify on a number of occasions the need to maintain or retain documented information, in order to give structure, clarity and evidence of the system being maintained and effective. The term Documented Information now replaces the previously used terms Documented Procedure and Records.

With ISO 14001, the text mainly follows the mandatory HLS text, except with some additional content in Clause 7.4, where the requirements around the importance of internal communications and external communications are emphasized. This is a natural legacy of the existing ISO 14001 and the importance of interested parties in environment issues. This area of Clause 7 also makes very clear the importance of ensuring in relation to environmental reporting and associated communications that the organization shall “ensure that environmental information communicated is consistent with information generated within the environmental management system, and is reliable”- an excellent addition and consistent with other corporate reporting standards. It also emphasizes the need to plan and implement a process for communications along the familiar ‘who, what, when how’ principles.

With ISO 9001, there is more additional text and a number of sub-sub-clauses, BUT these are mainly driven by the need to ensure that content from the existing ISO 9001:2008 is carried over effectively. The key points here are:

  • The sub-clause 7.1 also includes additional content on resources, environment and monitoring and measuring resources. These are requirements from ISO 9001:2008, albeit ‘revamped’ a bit to reflect the fact that these assets can now be broader and can cover not just equipment and hardware.
  • There is also a very interesting additional requirement under sub-clause 7.1 termed “Organizational Knowledge”, which relates to ensuring that the organization understands its internal and external knowledge needs, and can demonstrate how this is managed. This could also include knowledge management of resources, and ensuring that there is effective succession planning for personnel, and processes for capturing individual and group knowledge.

So what impact do the revisions have on the current approach to ISO 9001 and ISO 14001? In most areas this clause does not require any significant changes, but there are some of the additional requirements drafted for each standard which will require some new thinking, particularly around Organizational Knowledge. The changes introduced with the HLS in terms of not specifically requiring Documented Procedures is in reality not a significant issue- organizations still need to look at where Documented Information (e.g. processes, procedures, data, records) is critical for the management systems and its effective operation.

In Step 8 I will look at another important practical area of the standards- Clause 8: Operation.

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Contact us for support: Transition to the ISO 2015 revisions.

Do you have questions related to  the ISO 9001:2015 & ISO 14001:2015 revisions? Post them in our LinkedIn group , and our auditors Doug Milne and Niall Pembery will get back to you.

The post 10 things you need to know about the ISO 2015 revisions – STEP 7 appeared first on GoingSustainable.

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10 things you need to know about the ISO 2015 revisions – STEP 6http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-6/ http://www.goingsustainable.com/topics/evolution-of-certification/10-things-need-know-iso-2015-revisions-step-6/#comments Fri, 12 Dec 2014 10:42:33 +0000 http://www.goingsustainable.com/?p=29568 This step covers an excellent addition to the standards, introducing the concept of risk and opportunity via the High Level Structure.

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In my previous blogs I covered:

Step 1: ISO Publication and Beyond
Step 2: The High Level Structure
Step 3: Clauses 1, 2 and 3 – Scope, Normative References and Terms and Definitions
Step 4:
Context of the Organization
Step 5: Leadership

A quick reminder of the 10 Clauses of the HLS – this blog covers Clause 6:

1 Scope
2 Normative References
3 Terms and references
4 Context of the organization
5 Leadership
6 Planning
7 Support
8 Operation
9 Performance evaluation
10 Improvement

STEP 6: PLANNING

This Clause is an excellent addition to both ISO 9001 and ISO 14001, because it introduces the concept of risk (and opportunity) to both standards via the High Level Structure (HLS). This is also where I can genuinely claim that DNV GL has been in the “risk” business for a very long time- and by that I mean in the field of certification also- since we have been delivering Risk Based Certification since 2004. The approach is based on the audit being built around areas of risk to the organization’s business, in any relevant area, and auditing in depth to assess whether the organization is managing that risk effectively.

The new ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 have now captured the key concepts of risk management in Clause 6, primarily split into two main sub-clauses: 6.1- Actions to address risks and opportunities and 6.2- Objectives and planning to achieve them. In basic terms, it requires the organization to:

- Understand the range of risks and opportunities relevant to the scope of the organization and determine actions, objectives and plans to address them.
- In understanding those risk and opportunities, use the inputs that the organization has identified in understanding its context as required in Clause 4.1, and the views and inputs from interested parties in Clause 4.2.
- For ISO 14001 this Clause also includes the previous requirements to consider environmental aspects and compliance obligations, and determine those impacts which are of significance to the organization.
- Also consider the impacts of change and ensure that planning of change is effectively considered and managed.
- Establish objectives and targets and plans for quality and environment, ensuring that these are clear, measurable, monitored, communicated and resourced.

The strength of this Clause lies in both introducing the principles of risk and opportunity to management systems standards via the High Level Structure, and by connecting it very clearly to the processes defined under Clause 4. To remind us all- these are the clauses for determining the context of the organization and also considering the views and inputs from interested parties. Within the detail of ISO 9001:2015 and ISO 14001:2015 there are differences in content, with the ISO 14001 version containing the familiar previous content on aspects/impacts and compliance obligations. In this area the revised ISO 14001 also introduces the concept of “considering a life cycle perspective” for its products, services and activities. This makes the previous concepts of the upstream and downstream aspects clearer, and also introduces language now in common use across other standards as well as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and product assessment standards. The ISO 14001 standard content in Clause 6.1 has now been consolidated, clarified and streamlined to make the ‘flow’ of context, aspects and compliance obligations work better. In the previous version of my blog on this topic I said: “From a wider perspective, I think that there is natural overlap between the Clauses 4.1.and 4.2 on context and interested parties and the aspects/impacts/legal/other requirements. Perhaps there might be some streamlining of this in later versions of the new standards.” Job done.

With ISO 9001, there is an additional Clause 6.3 on Planning of Changes, which is effectively covered in ISO 14001 by the additional text on aspects and impacts. What is important is that both standards contain content requiring proper consideration of change and the impacts of change in terms of risk and opportunity.

How will organizations approach this new clause? A well-established approach already implemented by many organizations is the use of Risk Registers, which, if properly managed and implemented can capture effectively risks and opportunities across a wide range of areas and issues. There will also be other approaches which comprise different ‘elements’ from the various relevant Clauses of 9001 and 14001- the results from Clause 4.1 and 4.2, the existing ISO 14001 output from aspects/impacts, and legal/other requirements (expanded to ensure life cycle coverage), elements relating to management of change, with an overall analysis and review resulting in objectives, targets and plans.

The depth and complexity of approach will depend significantly on the size and complexity of the organization, as well as other factors which could include level of external regulation, existing requirements for public reporting, shareholder interests, public profile, numbers and types of customers, range and types of suppliers. Hence there will be a range of approaches which will be appropriate for the wide spectrum of organizations.
Overall, it is also worth repeating that there is very good informative content in both standards under both the Introduction and Annex A sections.

In Step 7 I will look at an important practical area of the standards- Clause 7: Support.

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Contact us for support: Transition to the ISO 2015 revisions.

Do you have questions related to  the ISO 9001:2015 & ISO 14001:2015 revisions? Post them in our LinkedIn group , and our auditors Doug Milne and Niall Pembery will get back to you.

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